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Barb Savage

Dear Malcolm, my husband bought me Outliers for our 34th wedding anniversary. I never finished Blink, it was overdue from the library. Guess I need my own copy, I'd read it for life. I can only digest it slowly, thought by thought.

You presented two problems from a Raven IQ test. Just had to try. It took me 1.5 hours to solve the 2nd one. I'd love to show you how I did it because you could have done it too. There was a clue in the puzzle that directed how to solve it. Ans. G would have worked had A not been there. After I had found the answer in my head, I had to draw all kinds of boxes and substitute numbers for symbols to highlight the patterns in order to show why A was a better ans. than G. I realized from the mental choices this puzzle presented that life throws us TOO MUCH INFORMATION, just as the puzzle threw in too many pairs of symbols to distract me from the answer: seeking out rows of 3 unlike symbols, not LIKE symbols. Just as I had to eliminate the extraneous info given in the puzzle, now I need to learn to eliminate 'good' information and 'good' possessions that distract me from becoming all I could be. Presently, I am a composer/ pianist, I play for choirs in a school system. Know what I want to be? Known for writing a book on geometry presented as art. I've already put in my 10,000 hours figuring out geometric designs that demonstrate principles that rival the golden rectangle. Fractals, logarithmic progressions, tessellations, what the square root of 3 LOOKS LIKE. Maybe I'm not a nobody after all. Guess I'd better start writing my book. Thanks for helping me to see better. A kiss for you,
Barbara 10-30-09

Robin Amadon

I have just listened to the Books on Tape version of Outliers and I want to raise money, send a set of the 7 discs to every public middle school in the United States and ask that it be the required listening-ALL SCHOOL LISTENS TO THE SAME BOOK--for I believe this writing has the power to change a teenager's view. Absolutely compelling and optimistic! I wish every adolescent and parent of an adolescent would listen.

Ed April

The weakest argument in the entire book Outliers is on pages 84/85 where you use job success among minority law school graduates. Since the EEOC and quotas distort the job situtation in the US, the results may be may skewed. The data may support your point but the results may have less to do will ability than "diversity" and quotas in the workplace.

Sylvia Harris

Just finished the book. Loved it. I have two questions:

1. In the table on Jamaican Lawyers, I noticed that a whopping 39 dark brown people were members of Parliament. Doesn't that contradict Galdwell's argument that light equaled success in Jamaica.

2. I wonder what would happen if programs like KIPP used their extra school hours to really provide enrichment (trips, independent reading, time to engage a passion, robotics, theater) instead of more structured academics. Upper middle class kids don't just use their summers and evenings for study and academics. They indulge their interests. I am concerned that kids in KIPP-type programs end up doing well on tests, but are still short-changed when it comes to developing cultural, creative and emotional agency that also is very important to success.

Prameet Savla

Few weeks back I picked up "Tipping Point" just by chance from the neighboring book store, I had no idea of it being a Best Seller and about Gladwell the writer.

By now I have finished reading Blink & Outlier, both these work have floored me and have changed the way I think.

Since I had finished with all your books, I came to your website looking for some articles read. To my surprise I find a launch of new book, I am all exited cant wait to get my hands on it. Any Idea when it will be available in India?

balaazs

hi,

i'm just reading your book, the first few chapters are really great (i also loved tipping point).
i'm pretty sure you've already been told, but if not: there is no Czechoslovakia since 1992 or 93.
best regards,

balazs pocze
budapest, hungary

Normand St-Pierre

Hello Malcolm,

I just finished reading Outliers. Thank you for reminding us about the culture of hard work. I am a 46 years old man from Montreal married to a wounderful lady from the Philippines. I have a son of eleven years old. I work for the Canadian federal government. Despite my cereblal palsy, I was able, through hard work, to earn an MBA and have a normal life. In Outliers, you have demonstrated with tremendous skills the path to success...

Normand St-Pierre

Pratul Agarwal

Hi! Have devoured Outliers just now and come to conclusion that success = Opportunity+preparedness, opportunity is something that comes by luck and how well we are prepared for the opportunities is in our hands. Irrespective of whether opportnities are now visible or will come in future, we must keep honing us

However, in Outliers, we measure the success on worldly terms - status, social position, name and fame. We msut also include factors like success in relations, joyous life, peace and happiness. We would then be looking at "True Outliers" in our society...may be the next book

Kannan

It was an interesting read. It all boils down to one aspect that you didn't cover in this book -Karma. What if the opportunities that were available to someone depended on their own karma in previous births?
Without just shrugging off this idea if you look at the horoscopes of all the profiles discussed in your book from vedic astrology point of view you will uncover that they were meant to be what they are. I want to point out that the vedic astrology of a person depends on the Time and location the person was born. So check it out for yourself. You can write part -2 of Outliers.

Clybern
Dave

I enjoyed outliers.

While watching the World International Junior Hockey game between Canada and Slovakia last night I sent a email to the head of Hockey Canada, the body largely charged with keeping the pipeline of Canadian Hockey talent in competitive mode.

I asked him about your Birthdate bias for training hockey talent and he was already very familiar and discussed the book heartily.

Apparently, he is a Gladwell fan and had already picked up your new book the previous night.

Go Canada!

Cláudio Roberto Kfuri Araújo

Hi, Malcom !

I liked very much your book "Outliers" and lately I´ve been interested in the new concept of "Gross Domestic Happiness" created by the govern of Bhutan (see http://www.sajaforum.org/2008/03/bhutan-wsj-look.html). I remembered of the "Roseto theory" you created in your book, and think that this theory of yours can contribute do the work being conducted by the Bhutan government to define, measure and promote de increase of the "Gross Domestic Happiness". Maybe you can visit one of the seminars about this issue (for example http://www.paradise-engineering.com/happiness/) to present your theory.

Best Regards,

Cláudio Araújo

Cláudio Roberto Kfuri Araújo

Just correcting and completing the comment above, I wanted to say "maybe you can visit one of the seminars about this issue to talk about how the conclusions that arise from the reading of the theory of Roseto, that you presented in the introduction of 'Outliers',can contribute to increase the Gross Domestic Happiness in all countries"

Cláudio Araújo

David Parker

Malcom,

I just read your book Outliers and thought it was very well written. However it left me feeling a little discouraged because I am a small business owner and sometimes in the book you make it seem like hard work and dedication aren't the reasons why people achieve. It seems more like it is a pure product of the environment you grew up in which I believes takes away from the blood sweat and tears one needs to endure to have a successful business. Just think sometimes the way you illustrate the examples of successful people it marginalizes the amount of effort it takes to succeed and the journey it took to get there. I am from an upper-middle class family and parents who do want me to stand up for myself, but I don't think that in anyway takes away from the fact of how difficult developing a successful business is. You are right it is great to have had parents who support you, but by categorizing all successful people and stripping them of their achievments by just crediting their success to their parents and grandparents, I think is unfair. It takes away their accomplishments by allowing the audience to believe it was all a product of the parents or grandparents hard work. Anyways I think the book was obviously well written, but I just think one needs to be careful of diminishing the "Outliers" successes by insinuating that anyone raised in the same environment with the god given tools they had would be able to achieve just the same. Regardless, thank you for your time and my apologizes if my response was a little too harsh.

Sincerely,
Dave Parker from Northern California

Rich

I bought Outliers for my son to read. I had read the inside jacket cover and thought it would provide anther perspective of what I have been trying to tell him. It seems a dad's words barely make it past the outter ear. Two weeks later I found it in his room and I finished it in one weekend. I wanted to take a moment and thank you for your wonderful perspective and observations of the quietly obvious. I think I'll keep trying to impress upon my son the lessons I have learned through trial and error and give him the book when he's my age. Somethings in life need to be experienced to understand their meaning.

Zehavit - Preschool Activities

I loved this book! I think every teacher should read it! I highly recommend it to my friends and to my website readers.

Zehavit - Preschool Activities

I love this book! I think it is a must read for teachers and highly recommend it to all my friends, colleagues and my website readers.

Alex Shimansky

Thank you for your fundamental work! I would have bought this book even for 1000$

Jane Perkinson

Many, many thanks for your work and thought. In the aftermath of the earthquake in Haiti, I'm hearing speculation about the reasons for that country's historic misery (in contrast to, say, its next-door neighbor, the Dominican Republic). I surely would be interested in your thoughts about causes and factors and, possibly, ways at this time to extend Haitian people a chance to thrive.

GEORGIANNA REYES Y RICARDO MONTES DE OCA

Why some people are remarkable successful and take a productive life, whereas majority never manages to develop its potential? Perhaps these people are most intelligent and talented?

The answer is that superstar have always been benefitted by hidden advantages, extraordinary opportunities and cultural legacies, that have allowed them to work and learn like anybody.

After examining the life of different icons like Mozart, Bill Gates and Gladwell, we can conclude that it’s worth more than intelligence to be successful.

Its common to think that successful people work really hard. But there are a lot of people that work hard and nevertheless they are not successful. So, the question arises, which talent or special gift have these people? We always asked ourselves for the characteristics of successful people.

The idea that explains that is necessary a high intelligence level to prevail is against intuition. For example, it’s obviously that science Nobel Prize winner has a great intellectual coefficient, has take the best university grades and has obtained all the imaginable scholarships.

Social influences determine acting of people even in specific fields such as airplanes accidents. Passenger’s airplanes are very reliable machines. Therefore, accidents do not happen because suddenly an airplane turns on fire.

GEORGIANNA REYES Y RICARDO MONTES DE OCA

Why some people are remarkable successful and take a productive life, whereas majority never manages to develop its potential? Perhaps these people are most intelligent and talented?

The answer is that superstar have always been benefitted by hidden advantages, extraordinary opportunities and cultural legacies, that have allowed them to work and learn like anybody.

After examining the life of different icons like Mozart, Bill Gates and Gladwell, we can conclude that it’s worth more than intelligence to be successful.

Its common to think that successful people work really hard. But there are a lot of people that work hard and nevertheless they are not successful. So, the question arises, which talent or special gift have these people? We always asked ourselves for the characteristics of successful people.

The idea that explains that is necessary a high intelligence level to prevail is against intuition. For example, it’s obviously that science Nobel Prize winner has a great intellectual coefficient, has take the best university grades and has obtained all the imaginable scholarships.

Social influences determine acting of people even in specific fields such as airplanes accidents. Passenger’s airplanes are very reliable machines. Therefore, accidents do not happen because suddenly an airplane turns on fire.

Andrés & Elizabeth

Dear Mr. Gladwell, we are students from Venezuela from the Monteávila University in Caracas and we have made an analysis of your book, Outliers.Reading the book was a great experience, it gave us a whole new way of defining success. We would like for you to check out our blog dedicated to your book http://outlieranalysis.blogspot.com/ and for you to tell us what you think of the work we have done, any advice you feel we need or simply any type of comment.We love your theory on spaghetti sauce!

We would love to hear from you

Andrés & Elizabeth

Ana C. Andrea R (profe Vicky)

This book explains the history of success and how success is presented differently in different types of people.

The book begins with an investigation of Gladwell on why a number of Canadian hockey players were born in the early months of the calendar year. The answer, he says, is that since hockey leagues determine eligibility for youth per calendar year, children born January 1 play in the same league as those born on 31 December that year. Because adolescents born earlier this year are larger and more mature than their younger competitors, often identified as best performers, leading to additional training and a higher probability of being selected for elite leagues hockey. This phenomenon in which "the rich richer and the poor poorer" is called "cumulative advantage" by Gladwell.

Malcolm Gladwell interviews Bill Gates and focuses on the opportunities given to him throughout his life that led to its success. Gladwell argues that greatness requires a lot of time, using the source of the musical talents of the Beatles and computer savvy of Bill Gates as examples.

Gladwell interviews Gates, who says the only access to a computer at a time when there were common helped him succeed. Without such access, Gladwell says that Gates would still be "a very intelligent, charming and driven by professional success," Gladwell explains that to reach the 10,000 hour rule, which considers the key to success in any field, is simply a matter of practice a specific task can be performed with 20 hours of work a week for 10 years. He also notes that he himself took exactly 10 years to meet the 10,000 hour rule, during his short stay in The American Spectator and his recent work at The Washington Post.

Gladwell constantly reminds the reader that genius is not the only or even the most important thing in determining the success of a person. Using an anecdote to illustrate his claim, he discusses the history of Christopher Langan, a man who ended up working at a horse farm in rural Missouri, despite having an IQ of 195 (Einstein's was 150). Gladwell notes that Langan has not achieved a high level of success by the environment he grew up in. No one in life with Langan, and nothing in their training to help you take advantage of his exceptional gifts, he had to find success for yourself

Noting that define innate natural abilities that should have helped so successful in life, Gladwell argues that Oppenheimer made education a fundamental difference in their lives. Oppenheimer grew up in one of the wealthiest neighborhoods in Manhattan, was the son of a successful businessman and painter, attended the School of Ethical Culture Fieldston on Central Park West, and was granted a childhood of concerted cultivation. The extreme values Oppenheimer argues that these opportunities given the opportunity to develop practical intelligence necessary for success.

Before the book ends, Gladwell argues on the basis only of his mother, of Jamaica, Joyce, a descendant of African slaves. Joyce attended University College London, where he met and fell in love with Graham Gladwell, a young mathematician. After moving with Canada, Graham became a math teacher and Joyce, a writer and therapist. While Gladwell acknowledges her mother's ambition and intelligence, which also points to opportunities offered to their parents that helped them live a better life than other descendants of slaves in the West Indies. Gladwell explains that, in 1700, owner of a white plantation in Jamaica purchased a slave and became his mistress. This act inadvertently save the slave and his offspring from a life of brutal servitude. As a descendant of slaves, this time, luck led to Gladwell's position relative success in life. Summing up the publication, Gladwell points out that success is not unusual or mysterious. It relies on a network of benefits and inheritance, some deserved, some not, some cattle, some just luck, "and at the end of the book, remarks," outliers was not intended as autobiography. But it can be read as an extended apology for my success. "

Andrea Garzon

GREAT

“For to everyone who has, more shall be given, and he will have an abundance; but from the one who does not have, even what he does have shall be taken away.” Matthew (25:29)

Malcolm Gladwell’s Outliers is one of the best publications in the history of understanding how social behavior affects in people’s success in a great manner. Success is a really complex goal, it doesn’t depend only in how hard you try but also in the opportunity that life gives you. If you have talent and you are really intelligent then practice, practice all you can and wait for opportunities you may never know if maybe you can be the next Ringo Star, Steve Jobs or Michael Jordan, but never forget that your culture is an almost determinative factor in success achievement it can determine who and how you are

Andrea Garzón


Andrea Garzon

GREAT

“For to everyone who has, more shall be given, and he will have an abundance; but from the one who does not have, even what he does have shall be taken away.” Matthew (25:29)

Malcolm Gladwell’s Outliers is one of the best publications in the history of understanding how social behavior affects in people’s success in a great manner. Success is a really complex goal, it doesn’t depend only in how hard you try but also in the opportunity that life gives you. If you have talent and you are really intelligent then practice, practice all you can and wait for opportunities you may never know if maybe you can be the next Ringo Star, Steve Jobs or Michael Jordan, but never forget that your culture is an almost determinative factor in success achievement it can determine who and how you are

Andrea Garzón
Carolina Salas

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  • I'm a writer for the New Yorker magazine, and the author of four books, "The Tipping Point: How Little Things Make a Big Difference", "Blink: The Power of Thinking Without Thinking" and "Outliers: The Story of Success." My latest book, "What the Dog Saw" is a compilation of stories published in The New Yorker. I was born in England, and raised in southwestern Ontario in Canada. Now I live in New York City.

    My great claim to fame is that I'm from the town where they invented the BlackBerry. My family also believes (with some justification) that we are distantly related to Colin Powell. I invite you to look closely at the photograph above and draw your own conclusions.

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    Blink

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    Tipping Point

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